Rebecca Stark is the author of The Good Portion — God, the second title in The Good Portion series, a series written specifically to encourage women to immerse themselves in the depths of Christian doctrine.

The Good Portion — God explores what Scripture teaches about God in hopes that readers will see his perfection, worth, magnificence, and beauty as they study his triune nature, infinite attributes, and wondrous works. 

Rebecca also blogs at Out of the Ordinary.

                         

Entries in theological terms (337)

Tuesday
Feb242015

Theological Term of the Week

Adonai
The Hebrew word for lord or master, and one of the names used for God in scripture. This name emphasizes God’s absolute authority over all creation, including all people.

  • In scripture: 

    Then he said, “Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak. Suppose thirty are found there.” He answered, “I will not do it, if I find thirty there.” He said, “Behold, I have undertaken to speak to the Lord. Suppose twenty are found there.” He answered, “For the sake of twenty I will not destroy it.” Then he said, “Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak again but this once. Suppose ten are found there.” He answered, “For the sake of ten I will not destroy it.” (Genesis 18:30-32 ESV)

  • From Louis Berkhof’s Systematic Theology:
  • 2. ’ADONAI. This name is related in meaning to the preceding ones. It is derived from either dun (din) or ’adan, both of which mean to judge, to rule, and thus points to God as the almighty Ruler, to whom everything is subject, and to whom man is related as a servant. In earlier times it was the usual name by which the people of Israel addressed God. Later on it was largely supplanted by the name Jehovah (Yahweh). 

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Tuesday
Feb172015

Theological Term of the Week

Elohim
The Hebrew word for God, and one of the names of God revealed in scripture, used first in Genesis 1:1. Scholars debate Elohim’s exact origin and meaning.

  • In scripture: 

    In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth… . And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. (Genesis 1:1, 3 ESV)

    And I will establish my covenant between me and you and your offspring after you throughout their generations for an everlasting covenant, to be God to you and to your offspring after you. (Genesis 17:7 ESV)

  • From Blue Letter Bible’s The Names of God in the Old Testament:
  • Elohim is translated as “God.” The derivation of the name Elohim is debatable to most scholars. Some believe it derived from ‘êlwhich, in turn, originates from the root word, ‘wl (which means “strong”). Others think that Elohim is derived from another two roots: ‘lh (which means “god”) in conjunction with ‘elôah (which means “fear”). And still others presume that both ‘êland Elohim come from ‘eloah.

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Tuesday
Feb102015

Theological Term of the Week

tetragrammaton
“[T]he four Hebrew letters that make up the name of God. In English the letters are basically equivalent to YHWH. It is from these four letters that the name of God is derived and has been rendered as Yahweh and Jehovah.”1

  • In scripture: 

    Then Moses said to God, “If I come to the people of Israel and say to them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what shall I say to them?” God said to Moses, “I AM WHO I AM.” And he said, “Say this to the people of Israel, ‘I AM has sent me to you.’” God also said to Moses, “Say this to the people of Israel, ‘The LORD [see note below], the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you.’ This is my name forever, and thus I am to be remembered throughout all generations. (Exodus 3:13-15 ESV)

    [In the ESV and many other translations, the word Lord, when spelled with capital letters, stands for the divine name, YHWH.]

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