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Thursday
Nov102011

A Catechism for Girls and Boys

Part II: Questions about The Ten Commandments

51. Q. Why is it called the Lord’s Day?
        A. Because on that day Christ rose from the dead.

(Click through to read scriptural proof.)

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Sunday
Nov062011

Sunday's Hymn: For All the Saints

For all the saints, who from their labors rest,
Who Thee by faith before the world confessed,
Thy name, O Jesus, be forever blessed.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

Thou wast their rock, their fortress and their might;
Thou, Lord, their captain in the well fought fight;
Thou, in the darkness drear, their one true Light.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

O may Thy soldiers, faithful, true and bold,
Fight as the saints who nobly fought of old,
And win with them the victor’s crown of gold.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

And when the strife is fierce, the warfare long,
Steals on the ear the distant triumph song,
And hearts are brave, again, and arms are strong.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

Will­iam W. How

Other hymns, worship songs, sermons etc. posted today:

Have you posted a hymn (or sermon, sermon notes, prayer, etc.) today and I missed it? Let me know by leaving a link in the comments or by contacting me using the contact form linked above, and I’ll add your post to the list.

Friday
Nov042011

Round the Sphere Again: God's Nature

Sovereign and Personal
“…God’s sovereignty and …God’s personhood, if they function in our lives properly, will serve both as powerful incentives to prayer and as direction for the way in which we approach God” (D. A. Carson).

Commision or Permission?
Collected thought on the God of openness theology. Would he really be off the hook, so to speak, when it comes to evil? (Triablogue).


Thursday
Nov032011

The Cross of Christ: Loving Our Enemies

This week’s reading from John Stott’s The Cross of Christ for Reading Classics Together at Challies.com is Chapter 12, Loving Our Enemies. This is a chapter I wouldn’t have anticipated in a book about the cross of Christ. I understand that it’s there in order to work out what it is to show in our relationships the same “combination of love and justice” as there is in the work of Christ on the cross, but it still felt out of place.

Christians, says Stott, are called to be peacemakers, and yet the kind of peace we make must be modeled on the peace of God. It may cost us to make peace; we may need to confess our fault in the dispute. At the same time, we cannot forgive when there is no repentance for real wrongs done.  

The Christian Home
 Christian parents will model their love for their children on God’s love, meaning they will seek the best for them, even at great cost. They will also model their discipline after God’s own discipline of his children.

The Church
Love and discipline should characterize the church family, too.

[T]he New Testament gives clear instruction about discipline, on the one hand its necessity for the sake of the church’s holiness, and on the other hand its constructive purpose, namely, if possible, to “win over” and “restore” the offending member. …[A]ll disciplinary action was to exhibit the love and justice of the cross.

The State
Stott bases what he says about the administration of justice by the state on Romans 12 and 13. The Christian attitude toward evil should be:

  • Evil is to be hated.
  • Evil is not to be repaid.
  • Evil is to be overcome. By this, Stott refers to these words of Paul: “Bless those who persecute you” and “if your enemy is hungry, feed him.”
  • Evil is to be punished. The first three on this list are the responses the individual Christian should make toward evil. This last one is to be carried out only by the state. The law enforcement officer, working for the state, is “God’s servant, an agent of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer.” 

 The origin of the states authority to punish evil is God, and the purpose of this authority it to reward good and punish evil. Stott goes on to say that this authority must be used in a way that is controlled and discriminate. Citizens must submit to the authority of the state.

To sum up this section:

Because its authority has been delegated to it by God, we must respect but not worship it. Because the purpose of its authority is to punish evil and promote goodness, it has no excuse for arbitrary government. To fulfill this purpose it may use coercion, but only minimum necessary force, not indiscriminate violence. We are to respect the state and its officials, giving them a discerning submission, not an uncritical subservience.

Next up is chapter 13, Suffering and Glory.

Thursday
Nov032011

Thankful Thursday

I’m thankful that my youngest daughter is coming with me on my upcoming trip because I hate travelling alone. And I’m thankful that flying is so much less expensive for us now than it used to be. I’m also thankful that there are no more trips planned after this trip, because I’m a true homebody.

I’m thankful for my home and the time I get to spend in it. I’m thankful for the son who is putting plastic on the older windows to keep out the winter drafts.

I’m thankful for my hands. Useful things, they are. When I was last at the dental hygenist, he asked me to demonstrate to him how I flossed my teeth. I did and he remarked that I had excellent dexterity. Not everyone does and some people have trouble keeping their teeth clean because of it. It’s a blessing to have hands that work well and I thank God for them.

I’m thankful that everything that happens to me is sifted through the hands of God who has been reconciled to me in Christ. 

Throughout this year I’m planning to post a few thoughts of thanksgiving each Thursday along with Kim at the Upward Call and others.